Dogface Soldier: The Life of General Lucian K. Truscott, Jr.

Dogface Soldier: The Life of General Lucian K. Truscott, Jr.

From Publisher’s Weekly:

Lucian K. Truscott Jr. (1895–1965) was one of America’s finest WWII combat commanders, building a reputation second only to George Patton as an inspiring and gifted leader. Today he is remembered only by specialists. Hefner, a retired army colonel and physician turned historian (Patton’s Bulldog: The Life and Service of General Walton H. Walter ), corrects that by combining extensive archival and printed sources with perceptive analysis. Truscott served in secondary theaters: the Mediterranean and southern France. But from Sicily and Anzio to the 1944 drive up the Rhône valley and the successful concluding of the Italian campaign as 5th Army’s commander, Truscott showed comprehensive skills in defense and attack, in amphibious landings and mobile operations. Hefner’s Truscott is not a genius, but rather the master of a craft painstakingly studied between the world wars and applied no less painstakingly in combat. He shared the hardships of his men; he drank like a Texan, and a gentleman; he never hesitated to question orders he thought would cost unnecessary casualties. To call him “a faithful and consummate soldier”—as Hefner does in this model general-officer biography—does Truscott no more than justice.

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